Monday, 24 April 2017

Memo, Mail & Me - It's Monday April 24th

Linking in with our fair hostess, Sian at From High In The Sky

Giving a very enthusiastic wave to all this Monday morning.

On Saturday, we participated in Open Doors Guelph.  The intent of Doors Open Guelph is to build awareness of the creative, artistic, cultural & heritage buildings by providing free access to these buildings & properties. There was quite a few buildings open on this day (10am to 4pm) & our intention was to visit with about 5-6 places but we ended up visiting only 4.  

Visit 1 was to the Armory, a building that is for army cadets in training, & a social club for retired army members, so not normally open to the public.  It was a building that I often drive by so I was excited to get inside for a nose about.  Our tour guide spent a lot of time talking about the renovation differences between the officer's mess hall & the lower ranks mess hall.  In the officer's mess hall there was a wonderful display of old photos from The Boer War, World War I & II, The Korean & the Vietnam Wars.  There was also a large tattered Canadian flag in a frame that had been flown over the base in Afghanistan.  Of the women & men taking part on this day, Mr Man & I thanked them all for serving our country.
 
Constructed in 1909 of red brick highlighted with limestone trim, the Armoury was designed by federal architects David Ewart and T.W. Fuller. Its castellated towers, battlements, and heavy wooden gate give the impression of a medieval fortress. The Officer’s Mess contains a collection of art and memorabilia of the 11th Field Regiment. A basement gun park and impressive parade area showcase the Regiment’s 160 years of service. Architectural style: Gothic Revival

Visit 2 was to the big Roman Catholic church in Guelph, Church of Our Immaculate Lady.  Our tour guide was a young lady who read from a prepared script & spoke very quietly - I must confuse Mr Man & I wandered off on our own, tagging in with other ongoing tours.  We have been in this church for two weddings, so we were hoping for a peek at upstairs &/or downstairs - both were off limits. It is a beautiful church inside & out.



In 1827, John Galt gave the highest hill for the building of a Catholic Church. Opened in 1888, with the towers added in 1926, the church was designed by Joseph Connelly in French Gothic tradition. It has many elements of traditional European cathedrals with beautiful stained glass windows, locally-quarried limestone walls, and unique carvings. From 2006 - 2015, a $12 million renovation restored the interior and exterior features. Architectural Style: Gothic Revival

Visit 3 was to St George's Anglican Church, another church & where I have attended a christening service.  Our tour guide(s) were the reason we got delayed in visiting other locations.  Jon was an amazing guide, funny & knew the church's history & stories without a script.  After the official tour, Mr Man & I hung back to sit in the church to admire, it felt so welcoming & we ended up in an additional hour discussion with two church elders.  Robert, who I couldn't help but think Lady Ella would have enjoyed his chat about the church bells & carillon.   The other elder, Don  was guarding & chatting about a Napoleonic artifact in the church's possession; a flower pot in copper.   In chatting to both gentlemen we talked about the ringing of church bells & how disappointed I am that our church doesn't ring the bells any longer because it annoys the neighbours.  Robert, in charge of the carillon said that across the province of Ontario the league of carillon have already worked out the service & the time for the ringing of the bells for when our Queen passes, (not for many years). Both men got very teary & emotional discussing this, which in turn got me very emotional. 



This church opened in 1873, replacing two earlier versions located in St. George’s Square. It was designed by Henry Langley, architect of many Ontario churches, including three in Guelph. A revival of the English Gothic medieval parish church, different roof lines indicate the different areas of the nave, choir, and sanctuary. A special feature is the 23-bell carillon donated by Arthur Cutten. Architectural Style: Gothic Revival

Visit 4 was to Macdonald Hall: School of Business & Economics,
a building on campus at the University of Guelph, which from the outside was such a beautiful red brick "home"  Even though it was a Saturday there were lots of students around preparing for finals as the entire building is now used for classes & study halls.  I was extremely disappointed once in side, it is all plastic, chrome & tempered glass.  Thankfully the original wood panelled walls & fireplaces were still in tact although most blocked off.  If ever there was a case of don't judge a book by it's cover, this was it.

Macdonald Hall was built in 1903 as the women’s dormitory for students at the Macdonald Institute. Designed by George M. Miller, it was the oldest residence at the University of Guelph. Now renovated to LEED silver certification, it contains flexible gathering spaces, classrooms, offices. The 1903 gymnasium and dining room have been transformed into modern learning areas while keeping some original features.
Architectural Style: Tudor Revival
Happy week ahead to all.

26 comments:

  1. the Open Doors Guelph sounds a great idea the churches look beautiful.

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    1. I like that not all cities have their Open Doors events on the same day, so easy enough to spread out the adventuring. I like the old style churches with lots of wood & stain glass.

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  2. Sounds like a great day. I was interested in all four of your stops, and enjoyed the history behind them. Our Landmark Society sponsors tours of homes and historic buildings here twice a year. The next one is the first weekend in June, and for the second year, I'll be a "house host" in one of them.

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    1. How cool is that, that your home is one of the landmarks to visit. While I was a less than impressed with a couple of the stops, I would definitely attend next year. A few other cities in our county have their Open Doors later in the summer so I think we will tour them also.

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  3. A friend was telling me recently about a similar scheme here. This year I'm going to make an effort to go have a look! What struck me about your notes for these building was the names of the people involved: they all sound as if they might have come from round here!

    Wishing you all the best for the week ahead.

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    1. Guelph's foundering fathers & architects are from Scotland, Ireland & England, so yes a rich GB history. I will definitely attend next year's Open Doors & can't wait to see which buildings are on the list then.

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  4. Thanks for such an interesting post. We have 'heritage days' here once a year, where the public are allowed access to a selection of historic buildings that are usually out if bounds.

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    1. Thanks Eileen. I like learning about my area's heritage, it is so diverse.

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  5. First off, nothing to do with anything but amazing clouds in that last photo! Love those churches, very nice indeed. Yes, now that my brain contains a peg labelled "bell foundry", I would definitely be interested in getting hold of some more information to hang on it. I was watching a programme the other day where the presenter visited a carillon in the USA. They played Chattanooga Choo Choo on it! Now i want to have a go playing one :o)
    As to all this talk of the Queen's demise - there seems to be a lot of it about lately. A whole double-page article in the paper only a week or two ago. I know it is inevitable and when it does happen those involved will need to be prepared but I couldn't help thinking it completely unnecessary (and in rather poor taste) to publish all the ins and outs about it now.
    Better go before the comment becomes longer than your post!

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    1. One of the tunes played on the carillon Saturday was Waltzing Matilda. Robert says that the schedule was begun when Prince Phillip was very ill a couple years ago with that kidney infection.

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  6. I've seen open door events but never been. I certainly will now.

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  7. Beautiful churches! That's a shame about Macdonald Hall not retaining its original character. That's one thing I love about old university campuses, is the feeling you get from the lovely old buildings. -Jenn

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    1. Thankfully the vet buildings are keeping the heritage in & out. One thing I like about visiting Guelph are the old buildings.

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  8. Sounds like a wonderful outing!

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    1. Surprisingly enough it turned out to be a good day & I already have in my calendar for next year.

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  9. Such a wonderful day.
    I love to peek into old building and imagine the world back then.

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    1. We didn't get to the two personal residences on the list but I am hoping that they are on either the Open Doors next year or the Christmas Home tour later in the year. Yes imaging the lives back then, especially when you see the photos of the people living/working/playing in some of these buildings.

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  10. What a fantastic idea, thanks for letting us know more about the interesting places you visited and sharing their history.

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    1. Thanks Debs, glad you enjoyed although I am sure I would never get a job as a travel advisor or writer - but really come to Canada see all the wonderful things here :)

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  11. I do enjoy a good nosey around buildings and love the whole Doors Open movement. 4 very interesting buildings you visited. have a great week

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    1. Thanks Helena. It was good to finally get to see inside the Armory as I have often imagined what was going on in that building & now I know :)

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  12. I usually try and attend the Bristol Open Doors. It is a fascinating day (as is your post). Like you we limit the number we do and usually try and cover one area. Sometimes the schedule is guided by those that need booking. All your visits look interesting and you obviously experienced some surprises which part of the fun of the day.
    Someone was telling me the other day about a programme about what is planned for Her Majesty's demise. Not a nice subject but I am sure she will be in the know of the plans.

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    1. Thanks Maggie.A few good surprises & I have discovered two other somewhat local Doors Open for June. I chuckle at myself when I talk about old buildings here which are just a few hundred years old, when you get to visit old buildings thousands of years old. When I sat in Westminster Abbey I got chills thinking of how old "she" is. I know that all of the royal family travel with mourning clothes & they all know of what needs to be in place for such occasions. I just cannot bare thinking of it as I get very emotional.

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  13. Thank you for sharing your visits with us!
    Like Sian, I find all of theses names and the history behind them fascinating!
    Have a beautiful week!
    xx

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    1. Always good to have you along & thanks for visiting.

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